“Did you ever hear about that man who had to cut off his own hand?” my friend asked me one day. With bewildered eyes I responded that I hadn’t but it sounded awful. My mind imagined all sorts of scenarios that would force this man to go to such extreme measures. The only thing that pounded through my head was the thought that I could never do that. Yet, young rock climber Aron Ralston resolved that it was either he amputate his own hand or perish. In April of 2003, Aron set out to climb the massive rock formations of Bluejohn Canyn in the state of Utah. As his expedition continued, the unthinkable happened and an 800 pound boulder loosened from the canyon side and came crashing down, catching Aron’s hand and pinning him to the wall. For six days Aron was trapped. He did his best to stay hydrated and keep himself warm but he knew that if he didn’t take action, he would face death. He decided the only way to free himself would be to cut off his hand with a multitool pocket knife he had with him. Aron survived and was later able to tell his story.

As amazing as this story is, Aron went through a lot more hardship than he had to. Before he set out to climb, he failed to do something that he normally had done in the past: he did not tell anyone where he was going. He didn’t ask someone to come looking for him if he didn’t make it back home at a certain time. So though people knew of his disappearance, no one knew where to look for him. In Ecclesiastes, Solomon says that “Two are better than one; because they have a good reward for their labour” (4:9). At times, we feel that we can do things by ourselves and quickly brush off others’ offers of help. Let us remember to embrace that offer of support from those around us, for by so doing, our efforts are more effective and our burdens are not so heavy. 

Learning the power of two,

Chelsea Garcia 

Comment