I still remember my first time on a Boeing 747, the "Queen of the Skies." I was only four and I remember thinking that this was such a massive airplane. We were aboard one operated by Cathay Pacific on our way to Hong Kong enroute to China, where my parents were planning on teaching English. I fell in love with the aircraft over the next 15 or so hours that we were on board. I even remember exploring with my dad and discovering the spiral staircase that first class passengers used to get to the second floor of the giant jet. The last time I was on a Boeing 747 was coming home from the Philippines, flying from Taipei to Anchorage. It was on this trip that I realized how old and cramped the seating was getting in these planes. As of January 4, however, you can no longer buy a ticket to fly on a Boeing 747 operated by a US airline. They have been replaced with newer, more economical aircraft. The last 747 was retired and flown to a desert grave in Arizona, to join other outdated aircraft.

Some people really struggle with change. I know I do. But it's often important that old things end so new things can begin. In the book of Ecclesiastes we read, "To everything there is a season, A time for every purpose under heaven" (Ecclesiastes 3:1). As we look at the world around us, things seem to be changing more rapidly than ever before. Technology is progressing quicker than anyone can follow. Even in the church, changes are happening faster than some appreciate. Yet when change happens, when something old is laid to rest, something new can begin to exist. Whether the new is better or worse often depends on how we use it. Instead of balking at everything new, let's try and find a way to use it for the honor and glory of God.

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